Google Scholar Alerts: What Is It And How To Create Alert

Google Scholar Alerts are an essential tool for anyone needing to stay updated with the latest academic research. This feature allows you to receive email notifications about new articles, journals, and publications that match your specific search terms.

Whether you’re a student, researcher, or academic, setting up Google Scholar Alerts can save you time and keep your literature review current.

In this article, we’ll explore what Google Scholar Alerts are and guide you through the simple steps to create them.

What Are Google Scholar Alerts?

Google Scholar Alerts are a powerful tool for staying up-to-date with the latest research. They allow you to set up alerts for new results matching your search terms. 

Google Scholar Alerts

Enter your keyword, such as “flipped learning,” and specify your preferences. You can choose to receive 10 or 20 alerts per message. Google Scholar sends these directly to your email address.

This service is invaluable for university students, researchers, and academics who need to follow the latest developments in their fields.

You might set up alerts for new articles and research guides at your university. By doing so, you ensure you receive information on specific topics, authors, or publications. The alerts come a few times per week, providing a steady stream of relevant scholarly literature.

This tool can be particularly useful for compiling a comprehensive collection of citations. You can save these articles and check the author’s name, title, and journal.

Google Scholar Alerts not only bring back results but also keep you informed of new items published in your discipline.

Setting up alerts in Google Scholar is like having a personalised research assistant. It scours the academic landscape and sends you the latest:

  • research guides,
  • government publications, and
  • academic papers.

It’s an essential resource for anyone who needs to stay current with scholarly literature.

When Should You Use Google Scholar Alerts?

You should use Google Scholar Alerts when you need to stay updated on specific academic fields without constantly performing manual searches.

Setting up alerts for new results matching your research interests saves time and ensures you never miss important publications.

Imagine you’re a university student working on a thesis about renewable energy. You can set up an alert for keywords like “solar power advancements.” Google Scholar will send you email alerts with:

  • new articles,
  • journal publications, and
  • research guides at university libraries that match your search terms.

This way, you receive the latest research directly to your email address a few times per week.

Academics and researchers benefit greatly from this service. If you’re following a specific author or a niche topic, Google Scholar allows you to set up alerts that provide updates whenever new items matching your criteria are published.

An alert for a leading researcher in artificial intelligence ensures you are notified of their latest work. This helps in keeping your literature review current and your citations up-to-date.

Google Scholar Alerts are also ideal for compiling comprehensive research guides. By setting up alerts for various related keywords, you can gather a wide range of scholarly literature.

Combining alerts for “climate change,” “sustainability,” and “environmental policy” brings back results from multiple disciplines, enriching your research collection.

How To Set Up Email Alerts in Google Scholar?

Setting up Google Scholar Alerts is a great way to stay updated on the latest research and scholarly literature. Here’s how you can do it, with some insider tips to maximise your alerts.

Log in to Google Scholar using your Google account. This step is essential as it allows you to create alerts that are tailored to your email address. Once logged in, navigate to the alerts page by clicking on the “Alerts” icon.

To create an alert, click on the “Create Alert” button. A box will appear where you can enter your search keyword.

Let’s say you are researching “artificial intelligence,” enter this term in the search box. You can set up alerts for new results matching this keyword, ensuring you receive the latest articles and research guides at university libraries.

Specify your preferences for the number of results you wish to receive per email. Google Scholar allows you to set 10 or 20 alerts per message. This customisation is helpful if you want to receive a manageable number of articles without being overwhelmed.

After setting your preferences, click “Create Alert.” Your alert is now active, and you’ll start receiving email alerts for new articles and publications that match your search terms.

These alerts come a few times per week, keeping you informed without having to perform manual searches.

Google Scholar Alerts

To refine your alerts, you can set up multiple alerts for different keywords or authors. Besides “artificial intelligence,” you might set alerts for “machine learning” or specific authors’ names.

This approach ensures a comprehensive collection of relevant scholarly literature.

Google Scholar Alerts are a valuable resource for anyone involved in academic research. They provide timely updates and help you stay current with new publications in your field.

Google Scholar Alerts: Track Your Favourite Topics & Authors

Google Scholar Alerts are a powerful tool for staying updated on the latest research in your field. By setting up alerts, you receive timely email notifications about new articles, journals, and publications that match your search terms.

This service is invaluable for students, researchers, and academics who need to keep their literature reviews current and comprehensive.

Setting up alerts is simple and customisable, making it an essential resource for anyone engaged in scholarly research.

The Author

Dr Andrew Stapleton has a Masters and PhD in Chemistry from the UK and Australia. He has many years of research experience and has worked as a Postdoctoral Fellow and Associate at a number of Universities. Although having secured funding for his own research, he left academia to help others with his YouTube channel all about the inner workings of academia and how to make it work for you.